documentary critique by rev. neichelle r. guidry, phd

voiceless: a documentary on systemic poverty: is a poignant portrayal of the complexity and humanity of poverty in the United States of America. this documentary illuminates the hypocritical paradox of inequity and disparity in the “land of opportunity.” the primary vehicle for accomplishing this end is through the self-narrated stories of several individuals who are suffering through the imposition of homelessness.

in their own voices, viewers hear of how the problem of poverty is exacerbated by social location. sexism, racism, immigration status, criminal history and generational poverty produce nuanced intersections of suffering, immobility, and hopelessness. through their stories, people like Erica, a single mother of three, weave two common threads through the film. the first common thread is the idea that no one ever desires to be homeless, and the second is the fact that despite their greatest efforts, systems that were built to privilege the wealthy make it impossible for the poor to change their circumstances.

in the wake of the “tax cuts and jobs act,” these people and their stories are the clarion calls to conscious advocacy, self-surveillance of privilege and doing justice. enter Terence Lester, the starter of Love Beyond Walls. in this film, he gives an insider perspective on his March Against Poverty from Atlanta to Washington, D.C. to advocate for the poor. montages of his daily musings and meetings punctuate the film with images of the costs, challenges and joys of doing justice with and for the poor.

as a clergywoman, i am especially convicted by the critique of the church as an institution that does good only on Sundays, conflates justice with charity, and exchanges the poverty of Jesus for capitalistic prosperity. there is a flailing faith center in the fight against poverty, which is unfortunate because religious traditions, including but not limited to, Christianity, possess the means for leveling economic fields, galvanizing political resources and making lasting transformation. altogether, this documentary is a formidable, motivation, and it calls viewers into the fight. more importantly, it calls viewers into relationship, thereby humanizing the numbers and statistics of poverty through personal engagement with the poor and taking on their pain as our own, to feel and to eradicate.

rev. neichelle r. guidry, phd

32 Days Away!

We are officially 32 DAYS AWAY from launching our “Voiceless” documentary at The Center For Civil & Human Rights.

We have officially completed a workbook that will accompany the documentary to help people process the content and take next steps to get involved in their local communities.

Below is a sneak peek of the workbook! People will be able to use this in a small-group setting and find ways to mobilize and take action.

Notice People – Voiceless from Love Beyond Walls on Vimeo.

LBW Team

C.R. Snippet – Voiceless

Have you ever felt unheard?
Have you ever felt unseen?
Have you ever felt voiceless?

Every single day, millions of people experiencing homelessness and poverty like C.R. feel like their stories don’t matter.

On August 25, 2017, Love Beyond Walls will partner with The Center for Civil and Human Rights​ to screen our first feature length film “Voiceless” to give a voice to the voiceless.

Why? Because they matter and so do their stories!

To learn more, visit lovebeyondwalls.org/voicelessfilm

C.R. Snippet – Voiceless from Love Beyond Walls on Vimeo.

#voicelessfilm #lovebeyondwalls

LBW Team

The Wait is Over – You’re Invited!!!

On August 25, 2017, Join Love Beyond Walls and The Center for Civil and Human Rights for an evening screening of “Voiceless.”

This heartfelt film captures the 648 mile journey of the Love Beyond Walls Executive Director, Terence Lester, as he trekked from Atlanta, G.A. to Washington, D.C. to provide a voice to those facing systematic poverty.

If you have a heart for those experiencing homelessness and poverty, this film is for you.

To claim your free ticket, visit https://voicelessfilm.eventbrite.com

Seats are limited.

 

LBW Team

First Screening Reveal!

BIG NEWS: Almost 9 months ago, I (Terence) started walking from Atlanta, GA to Washington D.C. to bring attention to poverty in our country. It took me two months to complete this journey on foot – with my friend Johnny Taylor following in a bus!

Fast-forward, our organization (Love Beyond Walls) has turned this 700+ mile journey into a documentary telling the stories of those we met along the way. To make it even greater, we were asked to show our first official public screening at The Center For Civil & Human Rights Museum in August!
If you’ve never been and want to see this film, stay tuned for details as we prepare to give a voice to the voiceless nationally!

Terence

See Beautiful Gives Grant

Great news! This past week, we found out that Love Beyond Walls won a small grant from “See Beautiful” to complete our documentary workbook. This book will accompany our film that’s scheduled to release soon.

We are so grateful for the generosity of this group!

We can’t wait to give people “real time” processing material after watching the #voicelessfilm!
LBW Team

Editor [Johnny Taylor] – Voiceless

After taking a journey through five states, we were able to learn more about how poverty affects people across the U.S.

In this short video, Johnny Taylor gives insight as to who this film is for and who will relate after watching the footage.

Johnny serves as one of the editors of the “Voiceless” film. To learn more, visit lovebeyondwalls.org/voicelessfilm

Editor [Johnny Taylor] – Voiceless from Love Beyond Walls on Vimeo.

LBW Team

SIX DAYS WITH SHELTER

SIX DAYS WITH SHELTER: It’s been six days since Ronald stopped sleeping on the ground and started living in this small house our organization built and he’s already talking differently.

He says, “Now I feel like I have to accomplish some things like getting my ID, social security card and birth certificate. I also want to see if I can reconnect with some of my family back home if I can find anyone.”

Although he has not fully transitioned out of homelessness, having a solid support system has started to build his confidence that it’s possible to start again. He says, “Being warm has given me the space to think…”

Wow. “Being warm….”

Think about it, when life happens who can you call? Maybe a mother, close friend, dad, mentor, etc.

Well, when you’re experiencing homelessness there is a social isolation and depletion of all social equity that strips your strength from community.

That’s why we urge people who make generalizations about the homeless to NOTICE THEM. Noticing someone might give someone the courage they need to keep fighting.

Over the next two weeks, we are going to help him achieve some of his goals.

If you’d like to contribute basic necessities (such as food, bus cards, etc.) until we get him back home safe and sound reach out. 

Terence